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Sony Reader – the Device

This article was been published more than a year ago. The information may be outdated.

Note: For the next few posts, I will be discussing my choice of eBook, what I think of the device, the software, and finish off with a few tips for users.
 
As I stated in my previous post, I decided to go for Sony’s Reader as my choice of eBook. Getting one was easier said than done, as the Reader was not available in Norway at the time (a fact that has since been remedied).
 
The Reader comes with a brown faux-leather cover, adding to the book-feel. It is encased in a silver material of unknown type, though it seems to be some kind of metal. The eInk display is 6 inches, and the reader has ten numbered buttons, as well as a bookmark button, zoom button, two sets of page turn buttons and a directional button set. There is also an on/off slider and volume buttons.
 
Sony claims a battery life of up to 7500 page turns, which seems a little high, but close enough to the mark. The OS of the Reader is simple to navigate using the buttons, and the unit is very intuitive to use. Any supported files you might want to read can be either loaded to the Reader via USB, or copied to a memory card (SDHC and Memory Stick expansion ports are located on the top of the book) that you insert into the Reader, which will then display them in the menu system.
 
The Reader is slightly heavier than a book at 9oz, and a bit wider and taller than a paperback. The design of the Reader makes it immediately obvious that this is a Sony. The look and feel of the device is simply unmistakeable.
 
Along with the Reader comes a CD with one hundred books (all in the public domain), a user’s manual, a software CD, a USB cable and warranty information. A charger is available at an extra charge.

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