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How To Tech support Tips & Tricks

Microsoft Teams: Dial tone when calling in to meeting

Since starting to use Microsoft Teams, I’ve been encountering an issue when calling in to meetings; when joining a meeting, I’d get a loud buzzing on top of the meeting audio. Said buzzing was reminiscent of dial tones of yore. Digging into it a bit, I found that the buzzing ceased when I exited Skype for Business. Looking further, I was able to solve the issue by disabling the dial tone in sound settings. Here’s how:

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How To Tips & Tricks

Mapping a local folder to a Windows drive letter

A little while ago, I needed to simulate the File Explorer presentation of a network share in order to illustrate a point to a very non-technical customer of mine. Luckily, this is very easily accomplished through the use of either the subst or net use command line commands.

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How To Tech support Tips & Tricks

Outlook: Mark deleted messages as read

A pet peeve of many users of Outlook is the fact that deleted messages that were unread when being deleted are counted in Deleted Items. Like the behavior when going from one unread email to another in the Reading Pane, there is a setting for this. Here’s how to change the behavior:

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How To Microsoft Outlook Microsoft Outlook Tips & Tricks

Outlook: Disable the send without location prompt

Like many others, my work days are – to some extent – made up of meetings with others. It’s not uncommon for these meetings not to have an assigned meeting room, and I find it annoying that Outlook asks me if I want to enter a meeting location:

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How To Microsoft Windows Tips & Tricks

Deleting entries from the Run MRU List

If you’re like me, you use the run menu. A lot. One of the features I like about the run menu is that it stores your recently used commands in a list, called the Most Recently Used list (MRU for short). From time to time, I like to remove superfluous items from that list. Here’s how:

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How To SCCM Tech support Tips & Tricks

SCCM: Find client BIOS information

With some regularity, I find myself needing to fetch information from the BIOS of a client computer, preferably without having to go onsite to do so. This may be because I need to know what BIOS version the client is running, the serial number of the computer, or when it was manufactured. If you’re running SCCM (System Center Configuration Manager), this is relatively easily done. Here’s how:

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Tips & Tricks Wordpress

WordPress: Remove broken links

As a general rule, I don’t do much in the way of SEO (search engine optimization) on this blog. I’m not trying to sell anything, readership numbers are largely irrelevant to me, and I am not serving any ads. While I wouldn’t mind having a readership in the tens or hundreds of thousands, the fact is I have neither the time nor the inclination to spend money on increasing readership numbers.

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How To Tips & Tricks

GMail: Schedule sending of emails

From time to time, I have found it useful to schedule the sending of emails, such as reminders to others about something, requests for updates and so on. Luckily, this is a feature which is easily available in GMail.

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How To Tips & Tricks

Quickly check user logon time

With surprising regularity, I need to check when a user last logged in. I recently found a command that returns this information; quser. Using it is simple enough; open a command prompt, enter the command, and hit return:

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PowerShell Tips & Tricks

PowerShell: Building a script to find all members of several given groups

Last week, I showed you how I find all the nested members of a specified group. When we get requests for such audits, however, they usually specify doing so for a number of groups. Now, we could of course do it, one group at a time, adding information to our output as we go, however the script as written overwrites the file. What, then, if we want to run this on a number of groups, and avoid overwriting the file? That requires the -Append parameter:

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How To PowerShell Tips & Tricks

Building a script to find all members of a given group

Some time ago, I was asked to provide a list of everyone with access to a specific system. After communicating with the client, it transpired that they were particularly interested in knowing who were the members of a set of Active Directory groups. While this can be done manually, I wanted to try my hand at building a PowerShell-script that returned the information the client was asking for, and which I could reuse at some later point, as such requests pop up with some regularity.