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Thoughts on many things Posts

Disabling IPv6 or running IPv6/IPv4

This article was been published more than a year ago. The information may be outdated.

If you’re running Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 with DHCP, you’ll be likely to encounter problems if you don’t set up IPv6 properly. The fix is of course to set up IPv6 properly on the server, but there are a few workarounds if you can’t do that. You can’t uninstall IPv6, but you can, among others disable it, or configure it at will.
 
To disable it, clear the Internet Protocol version 6 (TCP/IPv6) check box in the properties of a network connection. You can also configure it a bit more than that. What you need to do is create a registry key and set it properly. Here’s how:
 

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Essential Console commands in Linux

This article was been published more than a year ago. The information may be outdated.

Having once again forgotten most of the commands I use in the command shell in Linux in general and Ubuntu especially, I did a quick google search, which turned up this thread at the Ubuntuforums. The thread had two amazingly useful links, both of which referred to quick reference cheat sheets provided by FOSSwire.com Here they are:
 

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Ubuntu: Reinstalling MadWifi

This article was been published more than a year ago. The information may be outdated.

I’ve been having some problems connecting my EeePC to wireless networks of late. The problem was that it didn’t detect available wireless networks, nor did it connect to the ones I’d already defined.
 
It runs Ubuntu 8.04, and I originally had to fuss around a bit to get the Atheros WLAN card to work. After reading more than a few forum posts, I found that reinstalling MadWifi most likely would fix the problem. The fix is done solely in the command line shell. I ran the following commands, in succession:
 

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Reducing memory usage in Mozilla Firefox

This article was been published more than a year ago. The information may be outdated.

If you’re like me, you use Mozilla Firefox as your preferred web browser. However, Firefox has one great weakness; its great love of RAM. I browsed around the web a bit, and found this workaround, which should help a bit at least. I have tried it, and it worked nicely for me.
 
What this workaround does is move Firefox to your hard drive when minimized, which results in Firefox taking up less RAM. Obviously, the amount of RAM taken up will increase when you maximize the window, but it appears to increase to less than it used to be, which could certainly be said to be an improvement.
 
The number one objection I have seen to this workaround is that people say that Firefx will take longer to maximize as the cache is located on the hard drive instead of in RAM. However, according to other bloggers out there, any delay is not noticeable.
 
Now, to the step-by-step:
 

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