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Tag: iPhone

Returning to Android

I’ve been a very happy iPhone user since I bought my first one back in 2011, when I replaced an Android phone with which I had neither been happy nor impressed. I have had a number of iPhones, each with more capabilities than the last, and am currently using an iPhone 7, with which I am very happy, and which ties in nicely with my setup at home and on the go, as I use a Mac, an Apple Watch, and Apple Airpods.

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Creating your own ringtones on iPhone

One of the most annoying things to me as a user, is the fact that I’m not able to assign my music files as ringtones. The “offical” way of adding more ringtones, is by buying them from Apple, however, you can generate them yourself, using your iPhone and a computer. To do so, you need an app that will create the ringtones for you, I use RMakerPro, but you may of course choose whichever you want. Here’s how I do it:
 

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The iPad

Yesterday, Apple announced the long-anticipated, much hyped iPad. Looking like an overgrown iPhone, it sports a 9.7″ screen, with a resolution of 1024×768, multi-touch and your choice of WLAN (all models) 3G (some models) and 16, 32 or 64 GB memory.
 
A commenter at NRK Beta said it was disappointing that it didn’t have some sort of eInk technology. Now, while eInk is GREAT for reading comfort and battery time, it has a deadly flaw for a device like the iPad; it has a screen refresh rate on par with, well a book (never mind the fact that eInk is so far only available as black and wh … err … gray).
 
To me, the iPad is NOT ideal for reading, for the exact same reasons why a device with eInk is; backlight and screen refresh. The backlight and screen refresh makes your eyes go tired much quicker, and, eInk having neither, it is actually like reading off darkish paper.
 
The book function being less than interesting to me, my interest, which, I admit, is piqued, is fading. As a websurfing device, well, it just doesn’t fo it for me. If I want an instant-on, touch screen device, I’ll use my phone. If I want to seriously surf the web, I want a computer, complete with a mouse and a keyboard.
 
Playing music? Sure, I could, but why not use an iPod or a Creative Zen; they’re smaller and have better power usage times. As for reading and editing documents, I’d rather have a computer to edit and either paper or eInk to read, so that’s out. Photo viewing and editing? Again, I want a computer.
 


The iPad

 
The form factor looks good, but I am still critical of both the weight and how long the battery will last. I notice that, like the iPod and iPhone, the iPad does not look like you can exchange the battery yourself, which I find a curious choice. Sure, for a tiny unit like the shuffle, I can understand it, but for an everyday usage unit like the iPhone? I don’t get it.
 
Using iPhone OS is an obvious, albeit exciting choice. Apple are basically saying that the iPhone OS is mature enough and powerful enough to be used on this kind of device. Also, by all accounts, it does exactly what an OS for a device like this should do; IT JUST WORKS.
 
While the tech geek in me goes “OOOH! SHINY!”, the sensible guy sitting somewhere deep down, right next door to the justification department, is going “Meh. Yet another device I have no use for.” And that, really, is what it all boils down to, isn’t it? The answer to the question “Do I have any real use for this?”
 
When all’s told, my interest is piqued, but I am not convinced, and I doubt that I will shell out the $499-$699 for one of these units. There are three main reasons for this:
 

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A new cellphone – Choosing platform

Note: For the next few posts, I will cover my choice of a new mobile phone, what considerations I have made and what applications I am running through it.
 
I’ve been using my old mobile phone, a Nokia E65, for almost two years now, and I am pretty impressed with it. It has had to stand up to a lot of abuse, and still works pretty well. Even so, I have been feeling it’s time to choose a new one, and this time I not only wanted a phone, I wanted a gadget as well, something with which I could do a lot of different things. In a word, I wanted a smartphone.
 
Strictly speaking, the E65 almost falls into that bracket already, with its options for expansion on the software side. The problem is just that there aren’t a lot of apps for it, and the outlook for that to expand is bleak to say the least. Also, it just isn’t sexy. At all. And really, I wanted something sexy now.
 
The list of contenders was quickly pared down; I was happy with Nokia, but what I’d seen of their offering on the market (the N97) just didn’t impress me much. I also felt it was much too clunky. Blackberry never even came into consideration, for reasons I’m not about to cover here. Samsung, Sony Ericsson and LG are all decent brands that I don’t like. This left me with two choices: Apple’s iPhone, or a phone running Android.
 
One of my major concerns was getting my list of contacts and my calendar up and running as quickly as possible. My employer uses DME Sync to sync Notes data to handheld units, but it’s not exactly as stable as I would like. On the other hand, I use Google Mail, Calendar and Contacts for most of my needs. DME Sync is available for the iPhone, but not Android. Google Sync is available for both platforms.
 
In the end, my choice came down to three things:
 

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